Explore 80+ Stunning 1700's House Design Most Trending, Most Beautiful, And Most Suitable

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Are you looking for the best 1700's house design of all time? If you're a fan of classic European architecture, 1700's house design is the perfect fit for you! From extravagant villas to charming country manors, this era was a time of transition and experimentation in important architecture styles. We've compiled a list of some of the most iconic and notable 1700's house design from across the continent to give you a glimpse of the different types of buildings from this era.

Colonial House Design

The colonial house design, which has roots in America's earliest settlers, is one of the most popular Art Deco house designs today. Featuring steep roofs with dormers, central front doorways, symmetrical proportions, and clapboard siding, this powerful and iconic tribute to American history has been widely adapted for use in modern and contemporary homes.

The wooden construction typical of most colonial house designs gives these homes a classic appeal even in the most contemporary settings. In the Art Deco style, these houses features patterned stucco walls paired with classic, double-hung windows for a modern charm. Inside, lofty and airy ceilings provide spaciousness to long galleries and make the home feel just as grand as their historic counterparts.

Colonial House Design

Georgian House Design

Born in New England, Georgian-style homes are renowned for their sense of grandeur and elegance. The Georgian house design, which dates back to the 18th century in the United States, was one of the most popular types of homes constructed in the country. These homes feature typically symmetrical facades with formal entrances, Palladian proportions, pediments and triangular roofs.

As a part of Art Deco style, Georgian-style homes are typically constructed with a smaller number of rooms due to their formal, rectangular floor plans. While traditional Georgian-style homes feature large gas-lit fireplaces, Art Deco Georgian homes opt for electric fireplaces and often feature large French windows that open up onto a garden or outdoor space.

Georgian House Design

Dutch Colonial House Design

The Dutch Colonial house design originated in the 1600s as settlers from the Netherlands immigrated to the colonies of North America and brought many of their traditional building features with them. Typically featuring a gambrel roof and stone walls, Dutch Colonial homes are made for taking advantage of natural light with large windows and doors that allow the sun to come streaming in.

As an Art Deco style, the Dutch Colonial look is updated with contemporary siding and typically unique stylings incorporated into the construction, such as a wrap-around porch or entry vestibule. Inside, the home is decidedly Dutch with soft yellow walls and wooden railings, while sturdy fireplaces provide warmth and modern amenities like an updated kitchen or open-plan living offer a touch of innovation.

Dutch Colonial House Design

Saltbox House Design

Primarily popular among New Englanders, the saltbox house design is a style of dwelling with an asymmetrical facade and two distinct rooflines. Featuring a typically steep roofline, saltbox homes are made to add abundant living space to a home without having to add more stories. This was most likely attributed to the fact that the colonial had to honor the concept of taxation-based on living area.

In the Art Deco style, the saltbox house design features bright exteriors with bold colors. The rooflines are often highlighted by darker colors, and these homes are usually given a unique, old-fashioned charm with its bay windows, central gable, and included chimney. Inside, saltbox designs are often made with wooden flooring and large fireplaces that offer a sense of intimacy to the interior.

Saltbox House Design

French Colonial House Design

The French colonial house design is one of the most popular and historically significant of all residential architectural styles. Featuring a unique style born from French settlers in the American colonies, these homes include steep roof pitches, stucco facade, and an open interior living space. French colonial houses were popular among the colonies in the 1700s and have remained a popular design choice to this day.

In the Art Deco style, French colonial designs are given a modern edge with symmetrical facades, rounded openings, and bright materials like stucco. The interiors often have an open floor plan and exposed wood beams, while the exterior is given a French touch with enclosed porches, tall and narrow shuttered windows, and colorful accents.

French Colonial House Design

Federal House Design

The Federal house design, otherwise known as Adam-style homes, was popular among the upper and middle classes of American society in the late-1700s. These neoclassical homes feature a skirt pediment entrance, narrow windows, and shutters flanking the sides.

The Federal style typically favored symmetry, allowing the airy and elongated shape to be emphasized with the addition of more windows and shutters. In the Art Deco style, the classical design is married with bold colors, updated rooflines, and the addition of elevated porch canopies and grand front doors that carry the Federal seal decorating their facades.

Federal House Design

Foursquare House Design

The foursquare house design is a four-room look which makes for a square, truncated roof design and simple, symmetrical layout. Popular during the start of the twentieth century and favored by middle-class urban families, the foursquare house featured quaint, two-story designs that provided modern facilities and lots of living space.

In the Art Deco style, the rooflines of these boxy homes are often folded for a distinctive look, and spacious second stories add an extra level of sophistication. Porches running along the front of the home also provide a unique touch, and inside, foursquare houses are often updated with contemporary conveniences like large windows, modern kitchens, and updated bathrooms.

Foursquare House Design

Cape Cod House Design

Thanks to its distinct, shingled and clapboarded look, the Cape Cod house design is one of the most recognizable of all American styles of houses. These one- or one-and-a-half-story homes often vary in shape and size, with steeply pitched roofs and symmetrical facades that exude a pastoral charm.

As part of an Art Deco home, Cape Cod house designs tend toward more modern touches, including curved accents, large windows, and bright and bold colors. Inside, contemporary finishes and chic design touches serve to modernize the traditionally wooden construction of these homes, giving them updated visual appeal while maintaining their classic charm.

Cape Cod House Design

Victorian House Design

The Victorian house design was hugely popular with the well-to-do during the late-1800s. Featuring high-end upgrades like wraparound porches, turreted towers, and balloon-frame construction, these homes have been an iconic part of the architecture of many cities in America for centuries.

In the modern Art Deco style, the Victorian aesthetic is characterized by bright colors, gabled rooflines, and balconied entrances. Windows, arches, and vertical columns adorn the outside, and inside these homes feature classic high ceilings and a distinct charm thanks to their swirly staircases and unique moldings.

Victorian House Design

Craftsman House Design

The Craftsman house design was the signature look of the Arts and Crafts movement in the United States, which lasted from the mid-1800s to the early 20th century. These homes often feature broad eaves, shed and gable roofs, and broad porches with double-hung windows to let in plenty of light.

In the Art Deco style, Craftsman houses are typically given a rustic, woodsy look, thanks to their use of large, oversized windows and natural materials like quarry stones. Inside, the addition of fireplaces to create an inviting and cozy atmosphere is often found in these homes. Additionally, Craftsman homes in the Art Deco style are usually filled with updated amenities, such as updated kitchens and bathrooms and plenty of natural light.

Craftsman House Design

Queen Anne House Design

The Queen Anne house design was first built in the United States in the 1880s and became wildly popular by the end of the 19th century. These homes feature a distinct turret, an asymmetrical design, steep-sloped roofs, and an abundance of wood and other natural materials to give them an inviting, country feel.

The Queen Anne style of home is typically updated with an Art Deco flavor, featuring steeply pitched roofs, rounded windows, and a mixture of both rough and smooth textures. The interior of the home is also modernized with spacious living rooms, updated kitchens, and of course, plenty of wood accents to create an inviting connection with the exterior.

Queen Anne House Design

The Use of Ornate Woodwork, Symmetry, and Exterior Shutters in 1700's House Design

1700's House Design In the 1700s, house design featured ornate woodwork, symmetry, and exterior shutters that gave the exterior an added charm . This period in history coincides with the introduction of Anglo-Palladianism, which introduced many innovations in architecture, such as double-hung sash windows that increased air circulation and movable shutters for privacy and security.

Ornate Woodwork

1700's House Design In the building of these homes, ornate woodwork was used to create an inviting atmosphere. The trim would be stained and varnished in a number of different colors and styles, giving a unique look to each home. The wooden staircases in particular were intricately made with ornate patterns and shapes that added to the allure of the home.

Symmetry

1700's House Design The late 1700s in particular saw the increased use of symmetry in the building of homes. This style could be seen in the balance of the windows, doors and other features on the exterior of the home. This gave the homes a balanced, symmetrical look, enhancing the visual appeal.

Exterior Shutters

1700's House Design The practical purpose of exterior shutters was to provide privacy and protection from the elements, but they also added a decorative touch to the home. Shutters were symmetrical, with two or four shutters on each section of the home. This provided another element of symmetry and visual appeal . Shutters could also be used to add a splash of color to the home.

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